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Did you know that the actor who played Goldie in the 1970 blaxploitation classic “The Mack” is a member of Kappa Alpha Psi?

It is true, Maxwell Banks, better known as Max Julien, crossed through the Xi Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi at Howard University on the December 4th, 1954.

“A classically trained actor, Max began his career in New York’s Off-Broadway circuit including Joseph Papp’s Shakespeare-In-The-Park. Moving westward he landed co-starring roles with Jack Nicholson in Psych-Out and Candace Bergen in Columbia’s box-office hit Getting Straight,” Julien’s IMdB page states. On May 11, 1973 the film The Mack was released staring Max Julien and Richard Pryor and directed by Michael Campus.

The film is about the rise and fall of John “Goldie” Mickens, a man who returns to Oakland, California after a five-year prison sentence, and has a plan to achieve money and power by becoming a pimp. Goldie’s criminal ways juxtapose his brother Olinga’s Black Nationalist efforts to save the black community from drugs and violence.

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The movie has since become a cult hit and Julien has been referenced across music genres for decades. Stevie Wonder included Max in the dedications on his classic album Songs In The Key of Life and Eddie Murphy, Jim Carrey, Will Smith and Martin Lawrence have done Max Julien impersonations and referenced the actor.

He also wrote the screenplay for and co-produced, Warner Brothers’s blaxplotation classic Cleopatra Jones.

Julien also appeared in Def Jam’s How to Be a Player and has guest starred on TV shows such as The Mod Squad and One on One.

Check out the following clips from The Mack below.

(The following clip contain cursing and adult themes)

Share this on Facebook with a Nupe or someone who went to Howard.

Click on the arrows below to see photos of Max Julien.
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Back In The Day

These Zeta and Sigma Pictures Show What Black Greekdom Looked Like in Michigan in the Late 70s

Time for another blast from the past! This time we are taking you to Ferris State University in Big Rapids, Michigan to show you what Black greek life looked like for members of Phi Beta Sigma and Zeta Phi Beta in the 1970s.

Check out the photos below and share this with someone who was a member of a Black fraternity or sorority or a Black college student in the midwest in the late 1970s. These photos were taken around 1978, they might know someone in the photos!






Do you recognize anyone in these photos?

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Back In The Day

Jerry Rice Opens up About Joining Phi Beta Sigma as an Undergrad at Mississippi Valley State

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Did you know that former All Pro and arguably the “best receiver of all time”, Jerry Rice is a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.?

Rice attended Mississippi Valley State University from 1981 to 1984 where he became a standout receiver and acquired the nickname “World”, because there wasn’t a ball in the world he couldn’t catch. While he was killing it on the gridiron, he also pledged Phi Beta Sigma. We have found pictures of him from his undergrad Sigma days as well as an interview where he opens up about being a young Sigma.

In 2010, Rice sat down for an interview about the NFL, the Hall of Fame and his fraternity.

During the interview, Jerry is asked to talk about his undergrad greek days by the interviewer who is an Alpha.

“As an Ice Cold brother of Alpha Phi Alpha but I gotta mess with you man,” the interviewer states. “It’s all right man, we used to go after each other,” Jerry replied. “Its funny because those collegiate days, man, you never forget about that. You know, the people that you meet.”

Skip to the 3:12 mark in the video below to listen to the audio from the interview and make sure to check out our gallery below of photos of Jerry repping Phi Beta Sigma as an undergrad.

Click on the arrows below to see pictures of Rice as a young Sigma at Mississippi Valley State.

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Photo Cred: BluePhi.net

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Story Behind The Picture: Alpha Kappa Alpha’s Famed Marian Anderson And Segregation In New Orleans

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The following photograph depicts the Sorors of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. of New Orleans, as they gather to receive and regale the famous contralto and AKA Soror Marian Anderson.

According to Creolegen.com, “Miss Anderson was made an honorary member of AKA by the national organization after an incident wherein the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) refused to allow her to sing at Constitution Hall, a hall which the DAR owned. Daughters of the American Revolution had a strict policy against allowing African-American entertainers on their stage. In response, First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt withdrew her membership in the DAR and instead, invited Ms. Anderson to sing on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. This momentous event took place on Easter Sunday, 09 April 1939, before a crowd of 75,000 people.”


After this worldwide notoriety came to Miss Anderson, the Philadelphia native from a deeply religious family gained international star status.

The following photo was taken at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Kriege of St. Charles Avenue on Monday night (6/5/1940) after Soror Anderson, held her much anticipated recital at the Municipal Auditorium. At the home she was entertained by her New Orleans Alpha Kappa Alpha sisters who regarded her as the world’s greatest singer. While this event was packed and celebrated it also sparked racial tension,

“Marian Anderson’s appearance in New Orleans had not been without controversy. The white organizers of the concert had planned a whites-only event, but after vociferous protests from blacks, the Municipal Auditorium allocated seats for them only in the balcony. The NAACP protested that “horizontal” segregation of this kind was insulting to people of color and that only “vertical” segregation, whereby colored and whites sat on opposite sides of the hall but on the same level, would be acceptable.

When the Municipal Auditorium’s Commission rejected this demand, refusing to let blacks sit on the ground floor, the NAACP voted to boycott the concert. This proposed boycott split the black community. The sororities and fraternities wanted the concert to go ahead because they saw it as an opportunity for an internationally renowned black singer to perform in New Orleans. Even the Louisiana Weekly lashed out at the organization in print accusing its executive director, Roy Wilkins of “fighting to keep Negroes from hearing a great Negro artist.” The NAACP failed to persuade Ms. Anderson to cancel her appearance and failed to dissuade blacks from attending. They lost the fight and Anderson’s concert was held with Negroes sitting in the balcony. An event many would never forget.”

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Here is a documentary on Soror Marian Anderson for those who would like to learn more about her.

Click on the arrows below to see more videos of Soror Marian Anderson performing.

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