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Are you stuck wondering what your path in life should be? You might be good at many different things but may not want to choose a certain career path because you know that you are equally good at things that have nothing to do with said career track.

It turns out that you may be what TED speaker, Emilie Wapnick, has dubbed a “multipotentialite” or someone who is equally good at multiple things. In the past these people were known as “renaissance men/women” and having this quality was seen as ideal. Examples of great multipotentialites include Paul Robeson, Benjamin Franklin, and Leonardo da Vinci.

Check out this TED Talk that Wapnick gave on what multipotentialites are, what they should do in life and why you should be careful about asking a child “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

Share on social media if you believe you are a multipotentialite.

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AKAs

An Introverts Guide to Networking – Six Simple Steps

The following was written by author, speaker and social entrepreneur Keisha Mabry, a proud member of Alpha Kappa Alpha, Sorority Inc.

Hey, Friends. Let me start by first clearing the air. Yes. I am clearing the air and going on record to say — clears throat — NO ONE LIKES TO NETWORK! And I do mean no one. No one and nobody likes to do this because networking is a business card exchange, it’s transactional, it’s take-take-take, it’s quantity not quality and it’s cold and surface. So whether you are an extrovert or an introvert—no one likes to network.

So now that we are on the same page, let me continue by saying that this is not a guide to networking. I know I kind of lied to get you to read this, but if I were to title this article the introvert’s guide to connecting you would be confused. Very, very confused because no one refers to networking as connecting. No one and no body. Everyone refers to it as networking but there’s a difference. A BIG difference.

Connecting is story sharing, it’s people caring, it’s relational and reciprocal, it’s give-give-give, it’s quality not quantity, it’s warm and deep and most importantly it’s way different than networking. It’s different and I want you to walk away from this article knowing the difference and knowing that you do not have to be an extrovert like me to connect with peeps. So let’s get ready, let’s get set and let’s connect.

Ps…the tips below are for those wanting to connect and build genuine, authentic relationships with people not those wanting to network for the sake of using people When you connect and build your network prior to needing people your network and support system will be there when you are in need. Capisce?

 

  1. Have One-on-Ones. Often times extroverts, like me, are led to believe that introverts don’t like to connect and meet peeps – but they do. They just tend to prefer to do this one-on-one and not in groups. So my advice to you is to connect one-on-one. Meet people for coffee, lunch, dinner or brunch to chit and chat. Matter of fact, I do this all the time – like weekly – and it’s fairly easy. I start with the people I know, professionally and personally, and then I ask the people I know to recommend other folk. And just like that my connections grow and grow and grow. Now I am up to grabbing coffee or tea with one new person a week. So try it and see and meet, meet, meet.
  2. Volunteering is a great way to connect with people, and when I say volunteer I don’t just mean what you typically hear when you hear the word volunteer. When most people hear volunteer they think nonprofit and philanthropic—and although they could always use our time, talents and treasures—there’s plenty of other organizations and associations that could use these things too. There’s boards, camps, clubs, churches, clients, cohorts, colleges, committees, conferences, events, family, friends, fellowships, fraternities, sororities, hobbies, masterminds, military, professional, sports, travel and work groups to name a few. And there are so many things you can volunteer to do. You can volunteer to take the lead on something or volunteer to do the thing no one else wants to do. This will give you quick exposure too and another opportunity to meet folks that are new.
  3. Mentor and be Mentored. When people hear the word mentor, they get scared. Not because they don’t care but because of the time they have to spare. Mentor has become synonymous with time commitment and for this reason, many people are starting to resent it. But mentorship can be whatever two peeps decide it should be. It can be a check-in here or a cup of coffee there. It can be a weekly, monthly or even quarterly frequency. Again, it can be anything two peeps decide it should be. So call it something else if you want, pick your frequency and get to mentoring. You can mentor someone you know or someone new and you can even mentor someone that works with you. And while mentoring, you should be mentored too. So just do it. No more excuses and no more shooting mentorship the deuces. Just do it.
  4. Become a SME. It’s important to note that connecting isn’t always about you being proactive to meet peeps—connecting is also about you creating opportunities for folks to meet thee. And one way to do that is to become a SME. A SME is a subject matter expert and it’s something you should strive to be. Being a SME is a great way to meet peeps because when you are a SME people seek you out for your expertise. I’ve always been known for my connecting and socializing expertise, so when people seek resources, places to be and people to see—they seek me. What subject, what matter and what expertise can you share with the world? Coaching, investing, exercising, training—the list goes on and on and on. So identify it, certify it and don’t be quiet about it because the more you spread the news the more you will be introduced.
  5. Drop A Line. Make a new friend by dropping a line from time to time. I drop lines when people get promotions, when people get awards, when people graduate, when people join boards, when people get married and when people expand their family. If I don’t personally know the person, I drop lines via social media. If I personally know the person, I drop lines via email, text, phone calls, cards and sticky notes. But regardless of the medium, the message is always the same—congrats on such and such. And like dropping lines, you should also drop knowledge from time to time, like articles, resources, information and sources, because everyone has goals they are trying to reach and you can meet new peeps by helping them achieve.
  6. Be A Connector. Be a connector. Be a person that introduces people to other people. A person that introduces others to others that others should meet, and sooner than later people will return the favor. That’s it. This way is that simple and that quick.

Well, introverted friends, we have come to the end, BUT there’s a lot more where the above came from in my new book Hey Friend: 100 Ways to Connect with 100 People in 100 Days. It’s a must-read, a fun read and the ultimate guide to meeting peeps. Much luck on your connection journeys and don’t take it too seriously. Navigating an extroverted world as an introvert may sound like a lot but it can be done. Just breath, relax and have some fun!

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About Keisha Mabry: Keisha Mabry is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated. She is also an author, speaker and social entrepreneur on a mission to change the world one connection at a time by changing trajectories and changing minds. Her new book Hey Friend: 100 Ways to Connect with 100 People in 100 Days is a movement to make the world friendly again or at the very least friendlier than it’s ever been. It’s a must-read, a fun read and the ultimate guide to meeting new peeps. Learn more about this fearlessly free human being on LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and at www.keishamabry.com

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AKAs

Alpha Kappa Alpha Networking Pro Reveals 6 Innovative Tricks for Networking at Conferences

keisha mabry

Hey Friends. Allow me to introduce myself. My name is not HOV – it’s Keisha Mabry and I absolutely love networking. But my networking is not your typical networking. My networking is transitional not transactional, it’s about the person not the profession, it’s about the who not the do. Who people are – their hopes, dreams, passions and hobbies – not what they do from 9 to 5 just to stay alive. It’s friendworking, and I’ve been using friendworking for 10 years to meet everyone and everybody from my bae to Issa Rae.

Today, I’m going to share my top six ways to meet and greet peeps at conferences. Why conferences? Because it’s conference season and no matter how you cut or slice the piece of cake, pizza or pie everyone has had to do a little conference networking from time to time. So let’s get ready, let’s get set and let’s conference connect.

1. Volunteer. Not only does it take a village to raise a child, it also takes a village to pull off a conference. A vast village of organizers, speakers, teachers, mentors, advocates, sponsors and volunteers. And for being a part of this vast village one receives benefits and the benefits or a volunteer are legit! Very legit. Volunteers get free entry and access to very important peeps. Very important VIP peeps. Me personally, I’ve volunteered at everything from the NAACP to the Urban League, and by volunteering I’ve always been placed up close and personal with the VIP peeps I want to meet.

2. Connect with People Ahead of Time. My goal for every conference is to buy or get the guest list ahead of time. Like way ahead of time. Like three to four weeks if I can. Then I pre-plan by calling and emailing all of the attendees I want to connect with in advance. Then I wait. I wait for the calls and emails to trickle in. Some call and email me back instantly while others take their sweet precious time. Then there are folks that totally decline my invitation to meet. But for every no there’s always a yes so call, call, call, email, email, email, and connect, connect, connect.

3. Meet People in Lines. There are dozens of lines at conferences: breakfast lines, lunch lines, dinner lines and brunch lines. Then there’s the break lines, snack lines, getting in the door to workshop lines, shuttle lines and happy hour bar hop lines. There are dozens of lines and while in line I make good use of my time. I make good use of my time by saying hello to everyone standing or sitting next to me. Everyone and everybody.

Hello is a simple word with five letters but infinite power. However, we pass people on a daily basis without saying anything. Nothing. Not one thing. We pass people on a daily basis without saying a simple hello. On planes. On trains. In lines. And while we dine. We say nothing but we should. We should say something. We should say hello because a simple hello can lead to a million things, thangs and everything in between.

4. Arrive Early and Sit in the V. Not sure if you know about the V. But when I was in college, many professors would tell me that they teach and speak to the V of the classroom. Well my friends — conference speakers do the same. Imagine a room. Now imagine the professor’s or speaker’s point of view. Picture a V with the professor or speaker standing at the open end of the V and her/his vantage point ending in the back of the room where the two ends meet. That’s the V and that’s the area of the room most professors and speakers draw their attention to and speak to.

So — I always sit in the V and by sitting in the V it makes it easier for me to meet and greet with peeps — especially the speakers during their speech. It makes it easier because the speaker makes eye contact with the people in the V multiple times during her/his speech. They make eye contact and the eye contact makes it easier for you to connect, and easier for you to volunteer to speak so SIT IN THE V.

5. Ask Questions and Volunteer to Speak. I always ask questions and you should too. And when I say always I mean ALWAYS! At workshops. At conferences. At speaker series and professional development sessions. At every event, meeting and lesson. If there’s a Q&A—I have a question. By asking questions, not only do you make yourself memorable to the speaker, you also make yourself memorable to other attendees at the conference. But here’s the key…when you ask your question make sure you do the two following things:

Stand up and speak – don’t ask your question sitting down. Stand up with confidence and ask your question loud and proud.

Introduce yourself before asking your question. You now have the floor so take advantage and let everyone know who you are, what you do and how they can get ahold of you. I usually say. “Hey friends. My name is Keisha Mabry and I have a platform called Hey Friend that helps people build genuine, authentic relationships. You can learn more about me at keishamabry.com and you can find my book Hey Friend on Amazon.” And just like that I’ve made hundreds of connects.

6. Take Selfies — Lots and Lots of Selfies. When I was in graduate school and undergraduate school, all of my mentors would say the same thing. “Don’t forget your business cards,” they would say. “Business cards save the day because business cards will help you stay connected to all of the peeps that pass your way.” But business cards didn’t always work that way.

The older I got and the more conferences I attended – the less and less I became dependent on business cards. Most would end up in a pile on my desk, in a pile in my car, in a pile in my purse or washed and dryed away with dirt from the pants I work a few weeks before. No friends. Business cards were no longer working for me so instead I turned to selfies.

Selfies allowed me to take pictures of the peeps I would meet and tag them instantly. It was a friendworker’s dream come true. I could use social media as a reminder of the peeps I would meet, and not just a reminder for me but a reminder for the peeps. It also put a face with a name which isn’t always the case with business cards. Some people have their pictures on their cards but a vast majority of people do not. And last but certainly not least, selfies aided in follow-up emailing. People don’t always remember your name but they usually remember your face, and by simply uploading the selfie with me and the peeps I would meet, I noticed that the response rate of my follow-up emailing increased drastically. So use selfies friends! Use selfies!!!

About Keisha Mabry: Keisha Mabry is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated. She is also an author, speaker and social entrepreneur on a mission to change the world one connection at a time by changing trajectories and changing minds. Her new book Hey Friend: 100 Ways to Connect with 100 People in 100 Days is a movement to make the world friendly again or at the very least friendlier than it’s ever been. It’s a must-read, a fun read and the ultimate guide to meeting new peeps. Learn more about this fearlessly free human being on LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and at www.keishamabry.com

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Alphas

Alpha Phi Alpha Brother Opens Up About How He Landed a Job at Facebook Right Out of College

kevin pierre satterfield
Kevin Satterfield/ Facebook

He’s an Alpha, he went to Emory and he left undergrad with a job at Facebook, the largest social networking company in the world.

We at Watch The Yard connected with Kevin Satterfield, an initiate of the Mu Alpha Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., and got his take on landing jobs in the tech industry at companies like Facebook.

Check out the interview below.

Tell us quickly about your job at Facebook and what it entails? 
I work with global retail brands such as Neiman Marcus, BJ’s Wholesale Club, and Costco to develop their omni-channel marketing strategy on Facebook and Instagram. That usually entails building long-term relationships with key stakeholders of each partner in order to drive product adoption and incremental spend.

You studied political science in undergrad, how did you land a job at Facebook right out of college? 

The tech industry wasn’t in my line of sight when I was looking for internships during my junior year in college. I didn’t have any immediate connections from Emory and I wasn’t aware of any internships for candidates with my different background. With that being said, I had an Emory alum and fellow greek, Treasure Arthur (OXi Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta seated at Emory), reach out to me about an internship program at Google that is designed to expose underrepresented groups to the company and industry overall. She connected me to another Emory alum, Glenn, who did work for Google at the time on the recruiting team. Glenn provided constructive feedback for my resume and helped me prep for the interviews. I ended up interning at Google that summer and that opportunity is what enabled me to not only continue to pursue roles in the industry but it also made me qualified as a new graduate for any job that caught my eye.

How do you think being a involved with greekdom as a college student helped prepare you for what you do now?

In order to be successful at my job now, that requires a lot of time management and ruthless prioritization on my part. I have to think strategically about how much I’m working with one partner compared to another, and that investment has to pay off. I learned these same skills on campus when I was juggling academic priorities, chapter duties as Vice President, and extracurricular responsibilities as President of the Black Student Alliance among other things. All of these things required my time and energy, but being part of the chapter forced me to be very diligent about how I spent my time doing those other things I listed. I took all of those skills I learned at Emory and translated them to how I approach my day and my book of business.

What is your best advice for someone who wants to get hired at a large company like Facebook?

Do your due diligence by visiting the career site of each company to get a better sense of which functions they’re trying to grow. Every company, big or small, has one and they should be available to the public. Once you’ve narrowed your research to 2-3 opportunities, use your professional network to get introduced to people who are currently at these companies (and in these roles). Use these introductions as a way to understand more about the interview process, their experience in the role, and what the hiring managers are looking for beyond what you see on the application.

As someone who works at Facebook, what are some skills you think people who are undergrads or recent grads should pick up in order to make themselves more employable?’

The honest truth is that more and more roles within the tech industry are relying on statistical analysis for the day-to-day work, so being comfortable with programs such as Excel, Tableau, or R/Stata/SQL are always safe bets. You don’t have to be an expert in these tools, but being comfortable navigating them goes a long way. Moreover, a significant portion of my work requires communication with cross-functional teams at Facebook or my clients so getting more experience in relationship-building of any type is always a strong investment.

Kevin repping his fraternity Alpha Phi Alpha while on vacation in Greece

A lot of young people don’t know that you can work for a big tech company like Facebook even if you are not a STEM major. Often times this is because they don’t know the names of the jobs or departments at these companies. Can you give us names of jobs or departments at Facebook that they should look into?
For Facebook, the most popular teams for individuals young in their career are Sales/Marketing, People & Recruiting, and Community Operations. These are all teams that you’ll find on the non-technical side of the company, and this is where you see the most diversity with respect to background.

What can Black greeks who are established in tech related careers do to help the next generation?
Firstly, I think it starts with being connected to your chapter no matter how far removed you are. I’m appreciative that I have prophytes in and out of the tech industry, so if I ever needed advice or guidance about a career shift, I know I can lean on them. On the flip side, anytime a role opens on my team or a team that I can speak to, I make sure to surface that opportunity to everyone in my chapter whether they’re looking for new opportunities or not. I can speak from personal experience when I say that it really does take someone bringing an opportunity to your attention to act on it. Outside of my being engaged with the chapter, I think it’s important to make yourself as visible as possible in certain spaces (i.e. sorority/fraternity conventions and local professional happy hours) because these are environments that naturally foster conversations about career growth. Those individuals that are serious about making the move to tech will maintain that relationship and seek counsel when/where needed.

One major takeaway from Satterfield’s interview is that you should look for internships early on in college to get your foot in the door at large companies. If you are in undergrad make sure to network, ask questions and try out as many possibilities as you can, you will be surprised where great internships can take you.

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