Connect with us

Step Shows

#ZPhiB94 These Zetas Break It Down With A Founders’ Day Step

597 Shares

These ladies love their ZPhiB and you can tell by the precision of their steps.  Check out these lovely ladies of Zeta Phi Beta breaking it down for their yard and repping for their founders!

Happy Founders’ Day Zeta Phi Beta!!

zeta founders step

597 Shares

Leave Your Thoughts Below!

Advertisement
Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Opinon

3 Ways to Share Our Stepping & Strolling Traditions Without Giving Away Our Culture

Photo Cred: Jarrad Henderson

[This opinion piece was written by guest writer Aleidra Allen for WatchTheYard.com in 2016]

Some of you may have seen the video of incoming University of Louisville freshmen (predominately white and non-Greek) performing what appears to be a stroll, a long standing tradition within Black Greek-letter organization (BGLO) culture, and more recently, Multicultural Greek Council (MGC) culture, at their orientation (while strolling was originally a BGLO tradition, MGC organizations have created their own tradition of strolling, similar in the linear structure but including movements from their respective cultures). A quick glance at the 600+ comments will make it clear that some BGLO members feel it is no big deal while others are outraged and say it’s cultural appropriation.

I understand both of these perspectives. As a member of a BGLO and a Greek Life advisor, countless times, I have seen the teaching of strolls and steps used for community building between MGC and BGLOs and Panhellenic Conference and Interfraternity Council (historically white) organizations. On the other hand, I’ve also attended stroll competitions where I could barely stay in my seat because the appropriation was so real.

The main thing that this situation reveals is a disconnect within our BGLO community on if we should or should not teach white, non-BGLO people how to stroll and step. Because the fact of the matter is that they’re not learning this on their own; our BGLO members are teaching them (which is a main reason why some do not agree that it is cultural appropriation, being that permission is given). Whether you like it or not, this has become a popular collegiate norm. If we want to see change, this internal dissonance must be addressed; I encourage all of our organizations to create space in chapter and council meetings, regional conferences, and international conferences for this topic to be discussed.

Hear each other out. Listen to why some of us feel there’s no issue, and listen to why some of us believe the tradition needs to be held in high regard and reserved for BGLO members only. Maybe then we will be able to collectively decide one way or the other.

But I know that’s wishful thinking. It will be extremely difficult to come to a true consensus or for everyone to be willing to compromise. So while I acknowledge and understand the perspective that this is cultural appropriation and that some BGLO members feel it should be eliminated completely, I also acknowledge that some of y’all will continue to teach non-BGLO, white people how to stroll and step (and I understand that, too). And for you, here are 3 ways to do so in a constructive and meaningful way, moving away from outright cultural appropriation and disrespect.

 

1. Only allow strolling and stepping by non-BGLO people to occur at BGLO-sponsored events.

Strolling and stepping are our traditions. Period. Limiting strolling and stepping by non-BGLO members to the annual non-BGLO stroll competition or fundraiser that is hosted by us gives us the opportunity to control how this goes. We get to set boundaries and parameters. Let the non-BGLO participants know that this is a unique occasion and that it would be inappropriate for them to stroll at a social event or continue on as a step/stroll team outside of this event.

If a Panhellenic or IFC organization, or any non-BGLO entity (the orientation department in the University of Louisville case), ever takes it in their own hands and is creating strolls or making strolling a part of their sponsored events, I highly encourage you to have a conversation with them about why that is inappropriate, and also contact your Greek Life advisor to address this, as well. Never feel that as a BGLO member/student, you have to participate or accept a request to teach strolling/stepping to non-BGLO members. If we are going to share our culture, it should be on our own terms, in our own way, and at our own events.

 

2. ALWAYS provide a history of stepping and strolling.

Before you teach them anything, give them a history lesson. They want to partake in our culture? They need to learn about and understand it first. Talk about when and how strolling and stepping became a part of BGLO culture. Explain how important it is to us. Talk about the rules and protocol of stepping and strolling, and how y’all don’t even let your LS (line sister) and LB (line brother) who is rhythmically challenged get in the line or the show. In all seriousness, all this information will help the non-BGLO people understand the value of these traditions. Even though they are being given an opportunity to engage in the experience, they will now have context and an appreciation and respect for the tradition, and are less likely to take the culture on for themselves outside of this specific occasion. A history lesson should also be given at your event before the competition or performances begin to ensure that the audience is also educated. Contrary to cultural appropriation, cultural appreciation includes learning about and listening to people of the culture. Providing history will help you achieve that.

 

3. Don’t give them EVERYTHING.

It is very possible for us to share the traditions of stepping and strolling without giving away every single aspect that is near and dear to our hearts. However, some of us struggle to see that fine line. Unfortunately, I have attended stroll and step competitions that included non-BGLO people and have been absolutely mortified by seeing them link up and death march, sing All of My Love, shimmy, and more.

Y’all. We don’t have to give them everything. These are our traditions. It’s our history. Only we can truly understand the meaning and importance of these movements and songs. We can teach others how to step and stroll without handing them everything that we had to work hard to have the privilege to do. Put them in a line, incorporate some popular dances, teach them some steps from your middle school step team, and call it a day. That’s all they need.

I know this is an ongoing discussion topic and I’m sure some of you already have your rebuttals; and that’s okay. Let’s have the conversation; it’s needed. I hope this provides a new perspective to some, challenges you to think, and helps us to better understand each other.

Aleidra Allen is a program coordinator for multicultural education at Saint Louis University. In this role, she serves as the advisor to Black Greek-letter organizations in St. Louis. To learn more about Aleidra’s work, visit aleidraallen.com.

Leave Your Thoughts Below!

Continue Reading

AKAs

Watch How Alpha Kappa Alpha Holds It Down at the University of Delaware

Have you seen how the ladies of Alpha Kappa Alpha hold it down at the University of Delaware?

The ladies of the Lovely Lambda Gamma Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha at the University of Delaware performed in the school’s 2017 Yard Show. When it comes to representing, these ladies gave 1908% while holding it down for the PINK and GREEN!

Check out their show below and show these ladies some love!

Filmed by Grand Tour Media

Share this on Facebook if you think these University of Delaware AKAs deserve to go VIRAL!

Leave Your Thoughts Below!

Continue Reading

AKAs

The Glow Up! The Production Value Behind this Alpha Kappa Alpha Step Show From the AKAs in Dallas is Mind-Blowing!

Take notes D9 community because the AKAs from Dallas are setting the bar for how to produce a step show!

The Omicron Mu Omega Graduate Chapter from Dallas, Texas competed at Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated’s South Central Regional Conference in Shreveport, Louisiana and they blew the roof off the Shreveport Convention Center with GRADE A production value. The performance was done in front of over 2,000 sorors of Alpha Kappa Alpha and the Dallas AKAs went home with first place.

Check out their performance below and take notes! This is how you put on a show!

Share this on Facebook if you think these AKAs from Dallas deserve to go VIRAL!

Leave Your Thoughts Below!

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending